43rd Annual Conference on D.C. History


  • Walter E. Washington Convention Center 801 Mt Vernon Pl NW Washington, DC 20001

The Annual Conference began as a collaborative effort by The George Washington University, the DC Public Library, and the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. Its mission has remained constant: to provide a friendly and rigorous forum for discussing and promoting original research in the history of local Washington, D.C., and its metropolitan area.

The conference opens on Thursday, November 3, with the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Lecture honoring the memory of this pioneering scholar of D.C. history. This year’s speaker is Professor Adam Rothman of Georgetown University, a member of the university’s Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation. He will discuss the ongoing effort at the university to research its own history and reach out to the descendants of the Maryland Jesuit slave community.

Seventeen concurrent sessions on everyday life in D.C., archaeology, African American fraternal life, immigrant communities, journalism, civil rights, gentrification, architecture, and literature take place all day Friday and Saturday, including a showing of the award-winning film “Southeast 67.”

* Friday, Nov 4 Plenary Session (Room 143 B-C): Once Upon a Time in D.C.: Stories Hiding in the Stacks

Moderator: Izetta Autumn Mobley, Historical Society of Washington, D.C.

Panelists from area archives, where important city stories await discovery, present collections worthy of research. The research topics are also meant to intrigue and spark the writers of fiction and other creative media.

“From Private Thoughts to the Pilot District Project: Mining Collections for Characters,” Anne McDonough, Historical Society of Washington, D.C.

“Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Exploring the DC Public Library Archives,” Mark Greek, DC Public Library

“Historical Generosities: “(Re)Discovering the Tradition of Social Activism in D.C.,” Leah Richardson, Special Collections, George Washington University

“Digging for Extraordinary Stories in the District’s Archaeological Collections,” Christine Ames, DC Historic Preservation Office

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